When it comes to mapping and diagramming the network, is there such a thing as inviting ‘too many people to the party’? Of course, it’s always […]

How to Keep Your Network Diagram Project Right-Sized

When it comes to mapping and diagramming the network, is there such a thing as inviting ‘too many people to the party’? Of course, it’s always […]

abstract network connections

When it comes to mapping and diagramming the network, is there such a thing as inviting ‘too many people to the party’? Of course, it’s always more fun to invite others to your (network documentation) party…and, of course, sometimes you have to. Sometimes, however, it is more effective to start small and do just what needs to be done — and not invite the entire crew along.

Network Diagram Project: Which Team Members Matter?

People to consider including on your network diagram project include:

  • The entire IT team,
  • the network team,
  • the WAN team,
  • the server team…
  • the lunch lady,
  • and, of course, the guy who has been there for 50 years but you’re not really sure what he does, and so on.

When considering who to include on a network documentation project, you may want to both share costs and make the most of a product. However, sharing costs and striving to get the most out of a product could actually deter you from the original reason why you bought the product: to solve specific pain points you face managing the network.

Sometimes, you need to just get your network diagramming done: the more meetings, and the more requirements, the more personalities…the more disagreements…the more distractions and time delays.

Network Diagram Project: Avoid Red Tape

So…what to do? If you can, just stick to your issues and to your group. Don’t involve more people and more teams than is absolutely necessary to the documentation project.

Over time you may need to involve others, but if you need to get moving on a project now and can’t afford to get stuck in a red tape machine — try to just go it alone as much as possible. Start small, and then go bigger over time. As you progress, and gain more traction, in your diagramming project, you can then add in more people or departments.


Network Diagram Project: Find a Solution that Scales with Your Project

Consider starting with a SaaS product that can scale with your growth. Because you may not need to document everything all at once, you probably don’t want to end up purchasing a solution that comes with a price tag that’s so high you feel pressured into trying to do more than is feasible.

For example: maybe you can get start diagramming the network with a saas solution that charges $100 a month — instead of having to invest in a huge pot of dough at the outset. An SaaS solution can help you to keep your project right-sized…so you get the right results.

Can’t do SaaS? It’s ok to get an on-premise solution — but don’t get sucked into trying to make it do more than you are buying it for. Get your pain points solved first and then move on to finding other ways to get ROI out of the software.

Bottomline? Network documentation doesn’t have to be all or nothing. It can be something that starts small and grows up over time.

Example of a Network Diagram, L3

Jason Sherman
Jason Sherman
As Graphical Networks’ Sales Engineering and Support Services Manager, Jason Sherman leads the pre and post sales cycle with the entire Graphical Networks software portfolio, and ensures current customers are able to use the software to its fullest potential.

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